Steven G. Anderson

history, technology, and hypertext

wikipedia1-300x300A few months ago, I wrote about a Wikipedia Edit-a-thon workshop at the UCR Library on the CDH and HGSA websites. From these posts I was approached by Amy Tyson of the National Council on Public History’s History@Work blog. Amy covers the “In the Academy” section and she asked if I’d write about my experience at the workshop, which I happily agreed to. As it turned out, I also attended a THATCamp with a Wikipedia component, and I included that in my article as well.

My post, “Editing in public: Online identity and the Wikipedia Edit-a-thon,” is now live on the Public History Commons website.

 

Critical Digital Humanities is putting together a roundtable for this year’s Cultural Studies Association. The conference will be held from May 21-24, 2015 in Riverside, California at the Riverside Convention Center. This year’s theme is Another University Is Possible: Praxis, Activism, and the Promise of Critical Pedagogy. In keeping with this year’s theme, we would like to explore the question “What does critical digital humanities look like?”

The goal of this roundtable is to open a dialogue about critical approaches to digital humanities. Each participant will give a brief 5-7 minute provocation followed by a discussion.

Some topics for consideration, but not limitation:

–critical approaches to digital pedagogy, big data projects, data visualization, and digital scholarship
–specific campus initiatives, classes or programs that fall under the category of “critical digital humanities”
–limitations of critical digital humanities
–theory vs. practice in DH
–cultural studies and DH
–public scholarship, public humanities, and public history

Building off of the terrific energy from THATCamp, we would like to invite the DHSoCal community to consider having a role in this conversation! If you are interested, please contact Steve Anderson at sande010@ucr.edu and let us know what you are interested in discussing by Dec 1, 2014. Also, feel free to pass this on to friends and colleagues.

We look forward to hearing from you!
Steve Anderson, Rochelle Gold, and Sarah Lozier
http://cdh.ucr.edu/

At a few recent meetings we’ve talked about the new digital projects and resources being developed at UC Riverside, as well as other opportunities for graduate students and faculty interested in digital humanities.

Digital Scholars Lab

The UCR Rivera Library will be opening a new Digital Scholars Lab in the coming months. Over the Summer and Fall quarters, I’ve been working for the library as an advisor on digital scholarship projects and digital humanities in general. Once the Lab is open it will be a meeting place for graduate students, researchers, and faculty to start new digital scholarship projects or get help with existing ones. In the meantime if you need assistance with a project or would like more information on digital scholarship and digital humanities, please send me (Steve Anderson) an email: sande010@ucr.edu Although the Lab isn’t officially open at the moment, the Library is still happy to work with scholars and has many resources available. I’ve also made a website as a place to keep my notes for the development of the Lab. The website is a work in progress and it is not the official Lab website, but it does list many resources on digital scholarship and digital humanities: scholarslab.net

Critical Digital Humanities

For the past few years Critical Digital Humanities has been holding discussions on critical theory, reading groups on technoculture and digital media, and hosting invited speakers from a wide array of fields and subjects concerning the digital humanities. These workshops have been made possible by generous funding from the Center for Ideas and Society and Mellon workshop grants. For the 2014-2015 academic year CDH is working on pedagogy and production with Sergei Eisenstein’s unfinished film Que Viva Mexico! as our focus. More information on CDH events and other opportunities in digital humanities can be found on our website: http://cdh.ucr.edu

DHSocal

In Southern California the digital humanities community stays up to date on recent projects and opportunities through the DHSocal website: http://dhsocal.blogspot.com The calendar is up to date and active, there are lists of resources, and also CFPs and job opportunities. DHSocal is also on Twitter (@dhsocal and #dhsocal), but most of the activity takes place within individual accounts. If you’re just getting started with Twitter and DH, Miriam Posner (@miriamkp) over at UCLA has a very active Twitter feed, and don’t miss her weekly newsletter on DH happenings, tools, and opportunities: http://tinyletter.com/miriamposner

Digital Humanities Summer Programs

If you’re interested in digital humanities, week-long summer workshops are a great way to hone your skills and make new friends. Newcomers to the digital humanities are welcome, and most workshops do not require any technical programming skills or equipment. Over the summer I attended two of these workshops, and they were quite extraordinary experiences. HILT is the Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching workshop, which was held at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, or MITH, at the University of Maryland. This coming summer in 2015, HILT will be held at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) in Indianapolis, with registration beginning soon. The other workshop I attended was the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, or DHSI, at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. DHSI offers three separate weeks of instruction now and registration is currently open. Both HILT and DHSI have many opportunities to offset the cost of travel and tuition, as well as on-campus housing. DHSI is also offering a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities which I hope to finish this year. There are other summer programs in Europe as well, the Joint Culture & Technology and CLARIN-D Summer School in Germany, and the Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School in England.

Crossposted at CDH and HGSA.

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THATCamp DHSoCal: Diving into Digital Humanities
October 24th and 25th, 2014
San Diego State University

THATCamp is “The Humanities and Technology Camp,” and it is an “un-conference” meeting where humanists and technologists of all skill levels learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot.

THATCamp DHSoCal: Diving into Digital Humanities will be held at San Diego State University, but it is organized through a unique digital humanities-style collaboration between 4 regional institutions: San Diego State University (SDSU), University of California at San Diego (UCSD), California State University at San Marcos (CSUSM), and University of San Diego (USD).

Visit http://dhsocal2014.thatcamp.org/ for more information and to register online. It is free and open to the public.

The spirit is inclusive, so, please send this email far and wide—to anyone (colleagues, students, friends) interested in learning about the digital humanities, getting involved in regional collaborations, and geeking out on the intersection between traditional humanities and digital technologies.

Join us to dive into the digital humanities!

More information on the DHSoCal digital humanities group can be found at: http://dhsocal.blogspot.com

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Workshop Links

https://pinboard.in/u:sgahistory/t:digitalta


Ever wondered what digital pedagogy is? Want to know what it’s like to teach online?

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Wonder no more.

On February 19th, 2014, join us for an introductory session on digital pedagogy.

We will introduce you to what Canvas is and does. We will show you some of the applications that make online teaching as good (and sometimes better) than face-2-face teaching, and we’ll discuss some of the best practices for online education in the physical classroom and in the virtual one.

Location: UC Riverside, Surge 170

Date and time: Wednesday February 19th 4-6PM

This is the first of hopefully many sessions aimed at training graduate students (and anyone else) in digital pedagogies.

Please RSVP to Juliette Levy – juliette.levy@ucr.edu

Juliette Levy teaches online and face-2-face in the History Department at UCR and at UC Online.

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